Carolyn ‘braves the shave’ and raises £365 for charity

One of our carers, Carolyn has shaved her head and raised £365 in aid of charity!…

Carolyn Slater, took part in Macmillan Cancer Support’s ‘Brave the Shave’ campaign on August 26 in memory of her mother.

Fifty-four-year-old Carolyn from Bridgwater, said:

“I decided to shave my head as part of Macmillan’s ‘Brave the Shave’ campaign after losing my mum to breast cancer. I have also had relatives suffer in the past with the disease, as well as a close friend, who is currently going through it. So I wanted to do something to help show that I stand alongside them, as well as raising money and awareness.

I am thrilled to have raised £365 for the charity and would like to say a huge thank you to everyone who donated.

I was a bit nervous about shaving my head but I knew it was for a worthy cause and my hair will grow back eventually. It’s highly symbolic of the effects of cancer treatments on patients.”

People can still donate to Carolyn’s fundraising page at https://bravetheshave.macmillan.org.uk/shavers/carolyn-slater.

Macmillan Cancer Support provides specialist health care, information and financial support to people affected by cancer and their families. Its ‘Brave the Shave’ campaign is running throughout 2017 and encourages people to fundraise for the charity by shaving off the hair on their head to stand alongside cancer sufferers.

Nicky Norville, our Registered Manager said:

“We think what Carolyn has done for charity is absolutely fantastic and is a testament to how caring she is. It was certainly strange to see her come into work with no hair, but it’s for such a great cause that it was definitely worth it”

Carolyn before she braved the shaveCarolyn before she braved the shave Carolyn after she braved the shave

Notaro carers share tips on spotting early signs of dementia

Our Homecarers are sharing their tips on spotting the early signs of dementia

We look after many service users with dementia and train our carers to spot the signs early and how to look after those who already have the disease.

Nicky Norville, Registered Manager at NHC, said:

“According to the Alzheimer’s Society, there are currently 850,000 people with dementia in the UK, with numbers set to rise to more than one million by 2025, so it’s incredibly important to raise awareness and educate people on dementia.
Our carers are well-trained in looking out for the very early signs of dementia within a person and as part of World Alzheimer’s Month this month (September 2017.)
We have decided to share some tips to help anyone out there know what sort of things to look for in a loved-one.”

Signs include:

  • Memory loss, confusion and disorientation on a regular basis. In particular if it upsets the day-to-day living of a person
  • Difficulty with tasks that require organisation and planning
  • Behaviour and mood changes – people with dementia may start acting out of character and may suffer from noticeable mood swings, sometimes becoming aggressive
  • Trouble with communication – dementia can make it hard for people to communicate. They may have trouble finding the right words and may repeat things.

“Our carers know that if they spot any of these signs in any of our service users they must alert management who will approach the subject with the service user’s family. If anyone recognises any of these signs in a friend or loved-one we would recommend they seek medical advice.

We have a real understanding of the care and support needs of individuals living with dementia. And through training, our carers are able to recognise the importance of people’s past lives, their current needs and plan and prepare ways to help them to enjoy the present and future.
Care plans are tailored specifically to ensure they meet the individual’s needs. Anyone interested in our dementia care services, can give us a call on 01934 422800.”

World Alzheimer’s Month takes place throughout September and will highlight the importance of early detection and diagnosis of dementia.

One in six people over the age of 80 have dementia.

More than 225,000 people will develop dementia this year, which is one every three minutes.

 

Does your loved-one need extra help?

How to tell if your loved-one needs extra help

As your loved-one gets older, it’s important to start looking out for any signs that might mean they’re in need of a little extra help. We’ve put together some top tips on what you should look out for below:

Accidents

With age comes a greater risk of trips or falls and it can take longer for an older person to heal should they be injured from them. You can help by making sure there are no hazards around the home, but if you are noticing they have tripped or fallen on more than one occasion recently, it might be time to get some extra help.

We can provide carers who take on domestic duties around the home and can even help your loved-one when they’re out and about by accompanying them to appointments and events.

Weight loss and personal hygiene

Noticeable weight loss can be a sign that your loved-one may be struggling. It could be down to them forgetting to eat meals regularly or not having the energy or ambition to cook for themselves anymore. A change in personal hygiene is also a sign that they may be struggling with self-care.

Our carers are able to help with bathing, grooming, dressing and assist with eating.

Memory loss or confusion

Memory loss in old age is common but it’s important to keep an eye on this in case it develops into something more serious such as Alzheimer’s or dementia. If memory loss and confusion is upsetting your loved-one’s day-to-day living, it’s worth seeking medical advice.

We’re able to provide carers who can assist with medication reminders and care for those with Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Socialising

A strong social life is vital for anyone, so making sure your loved-one is keeping up with friends, family, neighbours and social events is important. If they are spending long periods of time not leaving the house and are becoming isolated, then extra care to help get them out and about might be needed.

If you feel your loved-one needs extra care in some capacity, we can send one of our Homecare Managers, Senior Carers or Care Coordinators out to you to carry out an assessment. You can find out more about this here.

Notaro encourages visits to the elderly to combat loneliness

 

WE are encouraging people from North Somerset to visit elderly relatives and neighbours, to help combat loneliness this month (July, 2017).

Our carers can sometimes be the only person service users see, so we would like to encourage more people to remember the elderly and pay them a visit.

Nicky Norville, Registered Manager, said:

“Although our service users receive visits from our carers, it’s always nice for them to have a visit and share a cuppa and a chat with a relative or neighbour, so we’re encouraging people to remember the elderly and help us in the battle to combat loneliness.”

According to the Campaign to End Loneliness; 17% of older people are in contact with family, friends and neighbours less than once a week and 11% are in contact less than once a month.

More than half of all people aged 75 and over live alone and roughly 3.9million say the television is their main company.

Nicky added:

“We believe everyone should try and spare at least half an hour during their week or weekend to pop in on an elderly relative, neighbour or friend.
They could even take them out or invite them over for lunch or dinner. Just a small amount of effort could really brighten an elderly person’s day.”

 

The battle to beat loneliness

In the care industry it is often a regular occurrence for our carers to meet individuals who are suffering from loneliness. This could be because they’re not as mobile as they used to be and so can’t get out of the house on a regular basis or simply because they don’t have friends or family living close by.

According to the Campaign to End Loneliness; 17% of older people are in contact with family, friends and neighbours less than once a week and 11% are in contact less than once a month.

More than half of all people aged 75 and over live alone and roughly 3.9million say the television is their main company.

63% of adults aged 52 or over who have been widowed, and 51% of the same group who are separated or divorced report they feel lonely some of the time or often.

Our carers are on a continuous mission to help end loneliness with the care they provide.

They are always a bright and smiling face for our service users to see and often can be the only person they’ll see that day or even that week. So it’s important for them to have a chat and act like more of a friend as well as a carer.

This small amount of effort on our carer’s behalf can really brighten someone’s day and we also encourage other people to do the same. Simply pop in on an elderly relative, friend or neighbour for a cuppa and a chat. You could even take them out or invite them over for lunch or dinner.

Manager reaches the final in Care & Support West Care Awards

Nicky Norville, Notaro Homecare Ltd Manager, is a finalist in Care & Support West Care Awards

We are all celebrating here at Notaro Homecare Ltd this week (July 2017) after hearing our manager is a finalist in the 2017 Care & Support West Care Awards.

Nicky Norville, is a finalist for the Home Care Manager Award.

Nicky, said:

“I’m so proud to be going through to the finals of these prestigious South West-based care industry awards.

I am only able to do my job thanks to the hard work and dedication of all the home carers and support staff that I work with here at Notaro Homecare. So, if I am lucky enough to be crowned a winner, I’ll be winning it for them as much as anything.”

The mum-of-two is responsible for ensuring the smooth day-to-day running of our domiciliary care agency by demonstrating strong positive ideas about professional practice and the rights of all people who use the service, particularly with regards to privacy, dignity, independence, choice, confidentiality and self-fulfillment.

The 49-year-old, who has lived in Weston-super-Mare all her life, is also tasked with supporting care staff and meeting the Fundamental Standards laid down by Care Quality Commission (CQC) and complying with the Care Act 2014 and all relevant legislative requirements including the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

The Care & Support West Care Awards cover Bath & North East Somerset, Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucester.

The presentation ceremony will take place on Saturday, October 14 in Bristol, when 22 winners will be announced from the 60 finalists chosen.

We are incredibly proud and wish Nicky the very best of luck for the finals in October!

Nicky Norville, Registered Manager
Nicky Norville, Registered Manager

Notaro helps unemployed get back to work

 

We are offering re-training to unemployed individuals who are looking for work. (July, 2017)

Notaro Homecare is looking to re-train unemployed people as carers.

Nicky Norville, Registered Manager said:

“Training as a carer is a great way for people who are currently unemployed to get themselves back into the working world.
Being unemployed can be very demoralising and many people would love to get back into the world of work but might not be aware of the opportunities working in the care industry can bring.
It is an extremely rewarding industry to work in and it gives people the opportunity to learn something new and gain extra qualifications and experience.
We provide free full training with the opportunity to achieve Qualification and Credit Framework (QCF) level 2. Our mandatory induction programme includes emergency first aid or first at work, safe handling of medicines, moving and handling people, health and safety, fire safety, safeguarding adults, infection control and food hygiene.
Other specific training is also available to staff, including dementia awareness, mental capacity act, equality and diversity, advanced care planning, end of life / palliative care, stroke training, MS training and peg feeding.”

We use Weston-super-Mare based, AAA Training Solutions, a specialist health and social care training company, to deliver full five day classroom based inductions, training and refresher training to experienced and non-experienced staff.

Steve Horler, Managing Director of AAA Training Solutions, said:

“Our induction course gives the candidates the necessary skills and knowledge they need to begin working in the care sector. We hope to provide the foundation for a career in care with Notaro and will support the individual with ongoing training and development.”

If you would like to train as a Community Carer, please either click here to apply online or call our recruitment team today on 01934 422800.

 

Mick, AAA trainer, with Paulette Ellis, new recruit, training First Aid
Mick, AAA trainer, with Paulette Ellis, new recruit, training First Aid

 

 

Knowing the signs of Dementia

There are currently 850,000 people in the UK suffering from Dementia and numbers are predicted to rise to one million by the year 2025.

We have been providing care for people with Dementia for many years and our staff have all received extensive training in Dementia awareness. They’re able to recognise the signs and symptoms of Dementia very quickly.

If you’re not too sure what the early signs of the disease are, then we have put together some things to look out for should you be worried about yourself or a friend or family member.

  • Some of the major signs of Dementia are memory loss, confusion and disorientation on a regular basis. In particular if it upsets the day-to-day living of a person
  • Difficulty with tasks that require organisation and planning
  • Behaviour and mood changes – people with Dementia may start acting out of character and may suffer from noticeable mood swings, sometimes becoming aggressive
  • Trouble with communication – Dementia can make it hard for people to communicate. They may have trouble finding the right words and may repeat things.

If you recognise any of these symptoms in yourself or a friend or loved-one, then seek advice from a doctor.

 

If you want to find out more about our Dementia care services, you can do so here.

Kelly takes to the skies for baby care charity

Our Housing Support Officer, Kelly Bishop, took to the skies for charity..

Kelly Bishop from Weston-super-Mare took part in a skydive for a baby care charity last weekend (Saturday, June 17, 2017).

30-year-old Kelly, who works as our Housing Support Officer, jumped in aid of Cots for Tots, which is a special care baby charity for sick and premature babies and the money raised is still being counted.

Kelly said:

“I am so proud of myself for completing the skydive. It was very nerve wracking to be sat in the plane and see it getting higher and higher, knowing I was going to have to jump out of it, but I just had to go through with it as the charity is so important to me. I have friends who have used the charity’s facilities so I know all about the great work it does and this is my way of giving back. The final amount raised is still being counted but I’d like to say a huge ‘thank you’ to everyone who has generously donated.”

Cots for Tots, which is based at Bristol’s Special Care Baby Unit at St Michael’s Hospital, raises funds for life-saving equipment and pioneering new facilities to transform the lives of babies from Bristol, the South West England, South Wales and throughout the UK.

The charity has its own dedicated 12 bedroom house providing free ‘home from home’ accommodation for parents, brothers and sisters of babies in the Special Care Baby Unit.

Nicky Norville, Registered Manager said:

“We are all so proud of Kelly for completing her skydive and would like to congratulate her on raising money for the charity. When our staff put their own personal time and effort into something so worthwhile it proves just how caring they really are, not just in the workplace, but in their personal life too.”

Kelly wearing her charity t-shirt ready after her skydive Kelly parachuting during skydive Kelly landing after skydive

Cupcake Day for Alzheimer’s Society

Our carers dish out cupcakes in aid of Dementia charity…

Our carers raised £30.76 for Alzheimer’s Society by baking and selling cupcakes.

The staff sold the cakes at Diamond Court in Worle to raise money to fight dementia as part of the Alzheimer’s Society’s Cupcake Day.

Emma Slattery, Operations Executive at Notaro Homecare Ltd said:

“Dementia care is just one of the many services we offer so many of our staff have first-hand experience dealing with people with the disorder and they understand how it can affect people and their families.
We always try to do as much as we can to help raise awareness and funds for important causes and we chose the Alzheimer’s Society Cupcake Day as it was a great way to get lots of people involved. People were able to come along and pick up some delicious cakes in exchange for a donation to the charity.”

According to the Alzheimer’s Society, Dementia is the number one cause of death in England and Wales.

Last year, it’s Cupcake Day raised £330,000, which is the equivalent to funding 11 PhD researches for one year, giving them the opportunity to undertake vital, potentially lifesaving work.

The Alzheimer’s Society is the UK’s leading dementia support and research charity for anyone affected by any form of dementia in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

cupcake day alzhiemers societycupcake day Alzheimer's Societycupcake day Alzheimer's Societycupcake day Alzheimer's Society